ARTBA Foundation Announces Financial Assistance to 11 Children of Fallen Highway Workers

(WASHINGTON)—Eleven children of highway workers who were killed on the job will receive college financial assistance for the 2017-18 school year from the American Road & Transportation Builders Association Transportation Development Foundation’s (ARTBA-TDF) “Lanford Family Highway Worker Memorial Scholarship” fund.

The scholarship program was established in 1999 with a gift from two Roanoke, Virginia, highway contractors and their companies—Stan Lanford (1999 ARTBA chairman) of Lanford Brothers, and Jack Lanford (1991 ARTBA chairman), with Adams Construction Company.  About 100 highway workers are killed annually in roadway construction and maintenance accidents, and thousands more are seriously injured.

Over the past 17 years, more than 130 scholarships have been given to students from 25 states to pursue college and technical training. The 2017 class includes:

 

Caitlyn Rains, Proctor, Ark.

Caitlyn’s father, James Rains, was killed in 2013 while working in a night construction zone for APAC Tennessee. Caitlyn plans to study physical therapy at the University of Central Arkansas in Conway.

Misty McNeil, Kountze, Texas & Amy McNeil Graves, Lumberton, Texas

Misty and Amy’s father, Jeffrey McNeil, was killed in 2005 while working for the Texas Department of Transportation. Misty plans to study radiologic technology at Lamar Institute of Technology in Beaumont. Amy is studying nursing at Lamar State College in Orange.

Kaitlyn Henry, Dennison, Ohio

Kaitlyn’s dad, Gary Henry, was struck by a construction vehicle and killed in 2013 while working on a state highway construction project on Interstate 270 near Columbus, Ohio. Kaitlyn will be a senior at Ohio University and is an intervention specialist major.

Andrea Pair, Spiro, Okla.

Andrea’s father, Shannon Pair, was struck and killed while working for Time Striping Inc., in 1998. Andrea will be a senior at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. She studies biochemistry.

Victoria Markle, Port Charlotte, Fla.

Victoria’s father, John Markle, was struck and killed on Florida’s I-75 in March 2016 while working for Ajax Paving Industries. Victoria will be a sophomore at Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers where she studies journalism.

Cirar Butler, Gunnison, Miss.

Cirar’s father, Henry Butler, Jr., was killed while driving a Mississippi Department of Transportation work truck during highway repairs in 2014. Cirar will be a sophomore at Coahoma Community College in Clarksdale, and studies physical therapy.

Kristen Jares, West, Texas

Kristen’s father, Gregory Jares, was killed in 2001 while working for the Texas Department of Transportation. Kristen will be a sophomore at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor in Belton where she studies exercise physiology.

Standra Jones, Jr., Gaston, S.C.

Stan’s father, Standra Jones, worked for the South Carolina Department of Transportation. In 2007, he was struck and killed while taking down work zone traffic controls on I-26 in Lexington County. Stan will be a junior at Clemson University and majors in engineering.

Willie Blevins, Commerce, Ga.

Willie’s mother, Kathy Blevins, worked for the Gwinnett County Department of Transportation. She had just finished painting turn-lane lines when her vehicle was struck and she was killed in 2004. Willie will be a junior studying pre-veterinarian at the University of North Georgia in Dahlonega.

Emily Jones, Billings, Mont.

Emily’s father, Richard Jones, was killed in a car accident in 2013 while working for Direct Traffic Control. Emily will be a senior at Montana State University and majors in criminal justice.

 

The ARTBA-TDF is interested in receiving contact leads on students who could benefit from the scholarship program. Please share them with ARTBA’s Eileen Houlihan at ehoulihan@artba.org or 202.289.4434.

For more than 30 years, the ARTBA Foundation, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entity, has worked to “promote research, education and public awareness” about the impacts of transportation investment. The Foundation supports an array of initiatives, including educational scholarships, awards, professional development academies, a transportation project safety certification program, roadway work zone safety and training programs, special economic reports and an exhibition on transportation at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

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Next Generation of Transportation Construction Industry Leaders Press Members of Congress on Highway Trust Fund Fix

(WASHINGTON) – Seventeen emerging leaders in the transportation design and construction industry participated in an intensive Washington, D.C., “boot camp” introduction to the federal legislative and regulatory processes, and then went to Capitol Hill to urge their members of Congress to find a permanent revenue fix for the Highway Trust Fund (HTF) and to fully fund the FAST Act for FY 2018.

They were in the Nation’s Capital May 16-18 as part of the American Road & Transportation Builders Association Transportation Development Foundation’s (ARTBA-TDF) “Industry Leader Development Program” (ILDP), an annual event held in conjunction with the association’s Federal Issues Program and the Transportation Construction Coalition Fly-In.

There have been nearly 700 graduates from over 200 industry firms in the program since it began in 1996 as the Young Executive Development Program.

The ILDP provides participants with a solid understanding of industry economics, how transportation work in the U.S. is funded and financed, how actions by the federal government impact the industry, and how they—and their company or agency—can become politically engaged.  Attendees also heard from House Highways & Transit Subcommittee Chairman Sam Graves (R-Mo.) at a dinner event, where he talked about the need to provide a permanent HTF solution and shared his views about federal aviation policy.

The 2017 ILDP class included:

  • Robert Alger, Jr., business development manager, Lane Construction Corporation, Chantilly, Va.
  • Richard Ames, senior project manager, AECOM, Conshohocken, Pa.
  • Luis Barragan, director of transportation, N.Y., Gannett Fleming, New York, N.Y.
  • Sofia Berger, senior vice president, U.S. transportation market, Louis Berger, New York, N.Y.
  • Matt Blake, lead construction estimator, Parsons, Westminster, Co.
  • Rick Both, vice president, Parsons, Sumner, Wash.
  • Erin Coates, bridge engineer, CH2M, Santa Ana, Calif.
  • Nick DiBartolo, general manager, Rogers Group, Inc., Columbia, Tenn.
  • Jason Fischer, P.E., project manager, Great Lakes Construction Co., Hinckley, Ohio
  • Dan Holley, marketing manager, 3M, St. Paul, Minn.
  • David Leber, project manager, Wagman Heavy Civil, York, Pa.
  • Johnny Limbaugh, director of business development & government relations, Wright Construction Group, Fort Myers, Fla.
  • Timothy Miller, civil engineer, AECOM, Chelmsford, Mass.
  • Matthew Mullally, project manager, AECOM, Chelmsford, Mass.
  • Madhu Narayanasamy, project manager, CDM Smith, Houston, Texas
  • Kevin Oberheim, project manager, Rummel, Klepper & Kahl, LLP, Baltimore, Md.
  • Jeffrey Saunders, estimator/performance manager, Thomson-Arthur Division of APAC-Atlantic, Greensboro, N.C.

Since 1985, the ARTBA-TDF, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entity, has worked to “promote research, education and public awareness” about the impacts of transportation investment. The Foundation supports an array of initiatives, including educational scholarships, awards, professional development academies, a transportation project safety certification program, roadway work zone safety and training programs, special economic reports and an exhibition on transportation at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

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Tennessee Contractor Steve Wright Receives ARTBA’s Highest Honor

Tony Boals, Wright Brothers Construction; Steve Wright; & Kent Starwalt, Tennessee Road Builders Association

(WASHINGTON) – Steve Wright, president of Charleston, Tennessee-based Wright Brothers Construction Company, is the sole recipient of the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s (ARTBA) highest honor—the  “ARTBA Award.” It was presented to Wright May 17 during the association’s Federal Issues Program held in the Nation’s Capital.

Established in 1960, the “ARTBA Award” recognizes individuals for outstanding contributions that have advanced the broad goals of the association. Over the years, recipients have included several governors, more than 25 U.S. senators or representatives, two U.S. secretaries of transportation and dozens of top leaders and executives from government and the private sector of the transportation construction industry.

Steve Wright’s roster of volunteer leadership positions in national and state associations puts him in an elite status. His ARTBA service includes: 2012 chairman, senior vice chairman, first vice chairman, southern region vice chairman, Contractors Division president, 2011 Strategic Planning Committee co-chair, 2007 Long-Range Planning Committee co-chair, Environmental Committee chairman, and the past five years as a trustee on the ARTBA Foundation board.  He’s also a past president (1998) of the Tennessee Road Builders Association, ARTBA’s chapter affiliate, and a long-time TRBA board member.

As a trustee on the ARTBA Foundation, he has played a leadership role in development of the annual Dr. J. Don Brock TransOvation Workshop and the new Safety Certification for Transportation Project ProfessionalsTM program.

Wright also owns a piece of ARTBA’s history. He is the first graduate of the Young Executive Development Program—known today as the Industry Leader Development Program (ILDP)—to be elected chairman of the board.  Created in 1996, the ILDP boasts of more than 650 graduates from 200 companies, state contractor chapters and public agencies.  The program, which provides a Washington, D.C.-based “boot camp” introduction to federal policymaking and advocacy, is aimed at building the next generation of industry leaders.

Established in 1902, Washington, D.C.-based ARTBA is the “consensus voice” of the U.S. transportation design and construction industry before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, news media and the general public.

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HNTB Executive Paul Yarossi named ARTBA Foundation Chairman

(WASHINGTON) – HNTB Executive Vice President Paul Yarossi, P.E., has been named chairman of the American Road & Transportation Builders Association Transportation Development Foundation (ARTBA-TDF) Board of Trustees. The announcement was made May 17 during the association’s Federal Issues Program in the Nation’s Capital.

Yarossi has been a volunteer ARTBA leader for nearly two decades, serving as 2011 chairman and as ARTBA-TDF vice chair since June 2014. His other ARTBA posts have included: senior vice chairman, first vice chairman, vice-chairman-at-large, chairman of the Transportation Design and Construction Innovation Advisory Committee and co-chairman of the ARTBA-SAFETEA-LU Reauthorization Task Force.

Yarossi’s industry experience is extensive. Since joining HNTB in 1973, he has been in involved with nearly every aspect of the firm. He served as president of HNTB Holdings Ltd., CEO and COO of HNTB Corporation, as chair of the firm’s aviation practice and as officer-in-charge for several company offices in New York and New Jersey. He also was instrumental in formulating HNTB’s training and development programs.

In addition to leadership roles within ARTBA, Yarossi has served on the Executive Committee of the Design Professionals Coalition and the Council on Competitiveness, and as a member of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Let’s Rebuild America Leadership Council.

Other trustees joining Yarossi on the ARTBA Foundation board include:

  • Leo Vecellio, Jr., chairman, president and CEO, Vecellio Group
  • Charlie Potts, chairman of the board, Heritage Construction & Materials
  • Bill Cox, president, Corman Construction
  • Tom Hill, CEO, Summit Materials
  • Paula Hammond, senior vice president, WSP USA
  • Rich Wagman, chairman, Wagman Companies
  • Steve Wright, president, Wright Brothers Construction
  • Nick Ivanoff, president, U.S. Transportation Market Segment, Louis Berger
  • David Zachry, CEO, Zachry Corporation
  • Pete Ruane, president and CEO, ARTBA

Established in 1985, the ARTBA-TDF is a 501(c)3 tax-exempt entity designed to “promote research, education and public awareness” about the impacts of transportation investment.

The Foundation’s more than $3 million annual budget supports an array of initiatives, including educational scholarships, awards, professional development academies, a transportation project safety certification program, roadway work zone safety and training, special economic reports and an exhibition on transportation at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

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Gardner Asphalt Supply LLC & Florida Transportation Builders’ Association Member Companies Overall Winner of 2017 ARTBA Foundation’s “Helping Hand” Awards

Gardner Asphalt Supply’s Jamie Hill accepts the Helping Hand Award from AECOM’s Matt Cummings.

7 Other Industry Firms Recognized

(WASHINGTON)—  Gardner Asphalt Supply LLC of Bartow, Fla., and Florida Transportation Builders’ Association member companies were named the first place winner in the 2017 “Helping Hand Awards,” an annual competition sponsored by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s Transportation Development Foundation (ARTBA-TDF).

The awards “recognize extraordinary programs – outside the scope of normal business operations— that demonstrably benefit and help improve the quality of life in the community where the company is based or conducts business.”

Indiana-based American Structurepoint, Inc., and the Florida-headquartered Munilla Family Foundation/MCM, are the respective second and third place winners. The awards were presented May 17 at an ARTBA Foundation awards lunch held in the Nation’s Capital.

Overall Winner: Gardner Asphalt Supply LLC & Florida Transportation Builders’ Association (FTBA) Member Companies

Gardner Asphalt Supply employee Jamie Hill came up with the idea to help Northside Christian School in St. Petersburg “get out from under the mud.” The school’s parking lot and surrounding land was unsafe and in dire need of repaving, but the $1.1 million price tag left the project out of reach for the private school.

Hill worked with Gardner and more than 30 FTBA members to provide services, materials and time to complete the project. The end result: a beautiful and safe parking lot with 350 spaces for faculty, parents and students, as well as LED lighting, new pillars, fencing and 300 trees on the school grounds. The project brought pride to the community, and made a major difference to the school.

2nd Place: American Structurepoint, Inc., Indianapolis

As part of its 50th anniversary, American Structurepoint was looking to make a significant donation to a major non-profit organization. The winning recipient of the $250,000 investment was the Indianapolis Public Schools “Project Lead the Way,” a national organization that provides transformative learning for kindergarten through 12th grade students and teachers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math.

The gift will enable every Indianapolis public elementary, middle and high school to offer the program and help engage students. It has already helped expand the program from four schools to 11 and from 400 students to more than 1,700 in its first year.

3rd Place: Munilla Family Foundation/MCM, Miami, Fla.

Family owned general contractor MCM has operated for nearly 35 years under the philosophy of “to whom much is given, much is expected.” The company makes it a priority to give back to the community. The Foundation financially supports social initiatives channeled through a close relationship with the United Way of Miami-Dade, including groups like the Archdiocese of Miami, American Cancer Society, and Big Brothers-Big Sisters.

Five other honorable mentions were presented, including:

  • SGL Corporate Community Investment: SGL Constructors, a joint venture of Skanksa, Granite Construction & LANE;
  • Good Guys Committee: WSP USA & the E-470 Public Highway Authority;
  • Louis Berger Philanthropic Initiatives; Louis Berger;
  • 50th Anniversary Days of Service: TranSystems; and
  • Kiewit’s Hawaii Guideway Project: Kiewit

Since 1985, the ARTBA-TDF, a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt entity, has worked to “promote research, education and public awareness” about the impacts of transportation investment. The Foundation supports an array of initiatives, including educational scholarships, awards, professional development academies, a transportation project safety certification program, roadway work zone safety and training programs, special economic reports and an exhibition on transportation at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History.

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ARTBA to Host 4th National Workshop for State & Local Transportation Advocates July 12 in Washington, D.C.

(WASHINGTON)—Last November, voters in 22 states approved 193 ballot initiatives to increase highway and public transit investment, and state legislatures and governors in four states in April 2017 alone approved bills to increase their respective gas taxes. Some of the key players behind these efforts will share best practices, playbook secrets and other keys to success during the 4th Annual “National Workshop for State & Local Transportation Advocates.”

The event is being held July 12 at the Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill in conjunction with the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s (ARTBA) 29th Annual Public Private Partnerships in Transportation Conference.

Sessions will focus on the various ways states raise revenue for transportation projects, including the strengths and challenges of different methods states use to levy motor fuel taxes, and what alternative funding options are being utilized. ARTBA Chief Economist Dr. Alison Premo Black will provide a comprehensive report on current funding trends. Workshop discussions will also explore unsuccessful funding campaigns and outline what went wrong.

Among the other key learning sessions:

  • “2016-2017 State Transportation Funding Roundtable”
  • “2013 State Gas Tax Increases: Where Are They Now?”
  • “State Transportation Funding Champion Legislators”
  • “Building America’s Economic Expressway Campaign”

Over 100 transportation construction executives, “better roads and transportation” professionals, state legislators, and chamber of commerce officials from 30 states participated in 2016’s workshop, which is a signature program of ARTBA’s Transportation Investment Advocacy Center (TIAC).

View the full agenda and register at: www.transportationinvestment.org.  Contact ARTBA’s Carolyn Kramer at ckramer@artba.org or 202.289.4434 with questions.

Established in 2014, TIAC is a first-of-its-kind, dynamic education program and Internet-based information resource designed to help citizens, legislators, organizations and businesses successfully grown transportation investment at the state and local levels through the legislative and ballot initiative processes.

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Four More States Set to Increase Gas Taxes to Support New Transportation Investments; New Analysis Shows Little Political Fallout

TIAC Logo91 % of legislators who supported an increased gas tax were reelected during the next general election; 98 % of lawmakers won their 2016 primary race

(WASHINGTON) – An examination of more than 2,500 state legislators from 16 states finds 91 percent of lawmakers who supported legislation to increase their state gas tax between 2013 and 2015 and ran for re-election won their seat during the next general election.

The analysis, from the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s Transportation Investment Advocacy Center (TIAC), comes as legislators in four states—Tennessee, Montana, California and Indiana—have voted this month to increase their state gas tax to support new transportation improvements. The respective governors of each state are expected to sign the measures. It brings to 21 the number of states that have increased fuel taxes since 2013.

For Republican state legislators who supported a gas tax increase, 95 percent were reelected, the same reelection rate as those officials who voted against the gas tax increase. Democrats who voted for a gas tax increase were reelected at 89 percent, compared to 86 percent who voted against the same legislation.

“The voters in these states understand that lawmakers are showing political will to increase resources for transportation investment. For the majority of these states, their gas tax had not been raised in over 15 years,” said ARTBA Chief Economist Dr. Alison Premo Black. “It is now up to Congress and the Trump administration to address the stability of the Highway Trust Fund, which provides revenue for over half of all state highway program capital outlays.”

More than 91 percent of legislators who sponsored bills to increase their state gas tax were also reelected.

Additional analysis of the 2016 primary elections in the eight states that passed a gas tax increase in 2015 found that 98 percent of Republican and 98 percent of Democratic lawmakers who approved a gas tax increase and ran for their seat in a primary race moved on to the general election, compared to 97 percent of legislators who had voted “no” on the gas tax increase.
Read the full report.

Established in 2014, TIAC is a first-of-its kind, dynamic education program and Internet-based information resource designed to help private citizens, legislators, organizations and businesses successfully grow transportation investment at the state and local levels through the legislative and ballot initiative processes. Visit the website, www.transportationinvestment.org.

“Waters of the United States” Rule Fundamentally Flawed, ARTBA Tells Senate Committee

(WASHINGTON)—The American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) April 26 told a U.S. Senate panel the controversial “waters of the United States” (WOTUS) rule is scientifically and legally flawed and should be repealed.

In comments submitted for an Environment & Public Works (EPW) Committee hearing, the association said the WOTUS rule threatens recent bipartisan achievements in reducing transportation project delays, noting “[a]ny reduction in delay gained from improvements to the project delivery process would likely be negated by the increased permitting requirements and opportunities for litigation caused by the WOTUS rule’s expansion of federal jurisdiction.”

At issue is how EPA is attempting to redefine what collections of water constitute the “waters of the United States” and are therefore subject to federal authority.  Before the Obama administration’s Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its new rule, ARTBA told the agency on several occasions that “roadside ditches are not, and should not be regulated as, traditional jurisdictional wetlands as they are not connected water bodies and they contribute to the public health and safety of the nation by dispersing water from roadways.” The rule, however, did not categorically exempt roadside ditches from federal jurisdiction.  Instead, the EPA ruled a litany of qualifications must be met before a roadside ditch can be deemed exempt from federal permitting requirements.

The association’s comments to the EPW Committee noted such a piecemeal approach would add another layer of burdensome permitting requirements, create confusion and increase permitting delays for transportation projects.  The new rule, it said, would also likely be used as a litigation tool to delay projects and, in the process, make them more expensive for taxpayers.

ARTBA is currently involved in federal litigation over the WOTUS rule, which has been stayed by a federal court of appeals.  President Donald Trump has directed the EPA to repeal the WOTUS rule, an effort which ARTBA supports.

Established in 1902, ARTBA represents the U.S. transportation construction industry before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, courts, news media and general public.

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“Drivers, Work Zone Safety Is in Your Hands,” ARTBA Foundation Says

#NWZAW: April 4 Kick-Off in Md. for 18th Annual Week Coincides with Unofficial Start of Construction Season

(WASHINGTON)—Imagine your office work space literally within feet of traffic whizzing by you at 60 miles per hour or more. That’s the situation facing road construction workers every day on transportation improvement projects all across America.

As part of the 18th annual National Work Zone Awareness Week (NWZAW) held April 3-7, the American Road & Transportation Builders Association (ARTBA) Foundation is calling on drivers to stay off their mobile devices, slow down, and pay close to attention to nearby road workers when traveling through these construction zones.

Nearly 700 people, including 130 workers, are killed annually in roadway work zone accidents. More than 35,000 people are injured in these sites.

The 18th annual event under the theme, “Work Zone Safety Is In Your Hands,” officially kicks off with an April 4 (10:30 a.m.) event hosted by the Maryland State Highway Administration at the Georgia Ave./Randolph Rd., interchange in Silver Spring, Md.

The annual NWZAW urges motorists to “Drive Toward Zero Crashes,” which means:

  • Read and follow work zone signs;
  • Pay attention to other drivers;
  • Stay focused, and avoid distractions such as mobile devices;
  • Expect the unexpected, try to anticipate problems; and
  • Keep your cool. Be patient.

The ARTBA Foundation’s National Work Zone Safety Information Clearinghouse (www.workzonesafety.org), is also available as a valuable resource for stakeholders interested in learning more about the safety risks and hazards with road construction zones.

The facility, which is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, handles more than 200,000 requests annually, can help users find information on: accident and crash data, flagging, emerging technologies and equipment, best practices, key safety experts, laws and regulations, safety standards, research publications, training videos and programs, and successful public education campaigns. Materials are available in Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, French, Russian, and Arabic.

The ARTBA Foundation also noted the late 2016 launch of another groundbreaking initiative aimed at improving motorist and worker safety. The Safety Certification for Transportation Project ProfessionalsTM (SCTPP) program features this vision: “To ensure the safety and well-being of construction workers, motorists, truck drivers, pedestrians and cyclists and their families by making transportation project sites worldwide zero-incident zones.”

To learn more about the SCTPP, visit: www.puttingsafetyfirst.org.

For information about the Work Zone Clearinghouse operations, contact ARTBA Senior Vice President of Safety Brad Sant or ARTBA Vice President of Safety & Environmental Compliance Una Connolly at 202.289.4434.

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Major Economic & Job Creation Boost Expected from Kansas Highway & Bridge Infrastructure Increase

(WASHINGTON) A new report finds that an annual $264 million increase in state highway and bridge infrastructure investment would support nearly $600 million in economic activity throughout all sectors of the Kansas economy. The additional demand, in turn, would also support or create 5,000 jobs—with over half being in sectors outside of the construction industry.

The analysis, conducted by the American Road & Transportation Builders Association’s (ARTBA) Chief Economist Dr. Alison Premo Black shows how the impacts of transportation capital investments trigger immediate economic activity, including cost savings for drivers, and new and sustained jobs, while yielding long-lived capital assets that facilitate economic activity for decades to come.

Black testified March 23 before a Kansas state legislature hearing about the report’s findings. The study was commissioned by the Kansas Contractors Association.

An annual investment level of $264 million is consistent with an increase in the state motor fuel tax of about 15 cents per gallon, which would cost the average driver about $5 to $10 a month, or less than 20 to 40 cents per day, but would help businesses increase output, grow the tax base and support jobs across all major sectors of the state economy, Black said.

The improvement in the state’s transportation network would include enhanced safety, lower operating costs, reduced congestion and an increase in both mobility and efficiency, ARTBA said.

In addition, Black’s analysis reveals that increased investment would:

  • Generate $594.3 million in additional economic output;
  • Increase gross state product (GSP) by nearly $304 million;
  • Grow state and local tax revenues by $29.4 million; and
  • Support or create an additional 5,308 jobs, with 52 percent of the employment outside of the construction industry, including an estimated 549 jobs in retail trade, 330 jobs in manufacturing and 321 jobs in health care and social assistance

Research shows that the economic return for every $1 invested in transportation infrastructure improvements can range up to $5.20. For drivers in Kansas, this could add up to as much as $1.3 billion in savings, not including the additional benefits of improving access to critical facilities like schools and hospitals or increases in business productivity, Black says.

More than 660,000 Kansas jobs in tourism, manufacturing, transportation and warehousing, agriculture and forestry, mining, retailing and wholesaling alone are fully dependent on the work done by the state’s transportation construction industry. These dependent industries provide a total payroll of $25.2 billion and their employees contribute $4.6 billion annually in state and federal payroll taxes, the ARTBA report found.

The annual $264 million investment would help restore some of the recent cuts to the Kansas highway program. The Kansas state legislature will have diverted about $3.5 billion from the state Highway Fund to the General Fund and other state agencies between FY 2011 and FY 2019 for non-transportation purposes. These diversions have had a significant market impact, Black said, delaying over $600 million in road projects because of a lack of funds and resulting in the loss of 3,000 construction jobs.

If the diverted funds were instead invested in highway and bridge projects, the construction work would generate $7.8 billion in economic activity throughout all sectors of the economy and provide an additional $4 billion in state GSP, the association said.

Read the full report: www.artba.org/economics/research/.

Since 1902, ARTBA has been the “consensus voice” of the U.S. transportation design and construction industry before Congress, the White House, federal agencies, news media and the general public.

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